Google unveils Daydream 2.0 featuring Chrome VR, YouTube VR and more

One of the major updates slated for later this year is Daydream 2.0 (codename Euphrates), announced by Google during a keynote focused on VR and AR at day 2 of I/O 2017. The standalone VR headset is being developed along with Qualcomm and will feature ‘WorldSense’ tracking tech as well as the latest Snapdragon 835 processor. It will also include two wide-angle cameras along with motion sensors to detect movement, and will most likely ship with a Daydream controller.

Users will be able to use Chrome in Daydream to browse the web while in virtual reality, access WebVR content with full Chrome Sync capabilities and have the possibility to screenshot, capture or cast any virtual experience on to a Chromecast-equipped TV. Separately, Google is also bringing augmented reality features to Chrome for Tango-supported phones. Development will also become much easier with Instant Preview, which allows developers to make changes on a computer and see them reflected on a VR headset in seconds.

The new system will be available on all current Daydream devices later this year, including the Galaxy S8 and S8+ and LG’s upcoming flagship device.

WebVR: Mozilla’s VR for the browser

Mozilla, makers of the popular Firefox browser, now offer immersive room-scale VR through a web browser and without downloads or installs. Introducing WebVR and A-Frame. That’s right. The apps in the platform can run within cheap smartphone headsets or more powerful sets such as Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. Both the Javascript API platform and HTML framework are open source and require no linear algebra or programming languages like C++ to develop.

Sharing is as fast and simple as sharing a web page, and it’s open to anybody,” said Sean White, senior vice president of emerging technologies at Mozilla. The new platform is expected to grow considerably in the next five years, providing new VR experiences in the fields of education, creative expression and product development.

 

Adidas and Carbon Launch First Tailored 3D-Printed Sneakers

Adidas has teamed up with 3D printing startup Carbon to mass produce its latest sneaker, the Futurecraft 4D. While 3D printers are generally not designed for manufacturing scale and lack the production-grade elastomers needed for a demanding athletic footwear application, Carbon’s rapid product development process enables adidas to iterate over 50 different lattices for the midsole before landing on the current design.

This partnership exemplifies how new technologies and materials are paving the way for custom, high-performance products that meet the unique needs of each customer.